The Bible and Corona

People in Biblical times didn’t have modern-day conveniences. Instead of GPS, they looked up to use the sky, both day and night. They studied the positions of stars to see what time of year it was and what direction to go. Instead of relying on the local soup kitchen or food pantry, people had to actively scavenge, hunt, and make food for themselves. I believe it goes without saying that people back then were wiser, more resourceful, and more grounded in reality than we are today. The information age has ironically made us stupid and detached.

Without technological distractions, the men and women of Biblical times could observe the world around them. They could document what lifestyles were beneficial and what weren’t: that’s how the Torah, Bible, and Quran came to be. The use of God, in these texts, is purely symbolic. We’ve come to discover that placing your faith in a supposed higher power elevates happiness because you realize your worries are irrelevant on the grand scheme of things. The Bible is essentially an ancient self-help book (my biased opinion, obviously). It can also function as an instruction manual for life (specifically the Book of Leviticus). Leviticus focuses on the self-destructive behaviors we’re not allowed to do. Having sex with a family member (incest) is one thing. Sleeping with animals (beastiality) is another. And drinking blood is a no-no.

Did you know that eating bats is also specifically forbidden in the Bible? Check Leviticus 11:19. Now, you have to wonder why that is. Why would they specifically list ravens, owls, herons, gulls, and bats as animals you’re not allowed to consume? Or animals with paws (basically 4-legged carnivores)?

For starters, these animals are very difficult to hunt: they’re too mobile and/or dangerous. Farm-raised chickens and cows, on the other hand, are easy targets.They’re not the most agile, either. From a practical standpoint, the Bible forbids consumption of most animals for that reason.

Further, some animals have access to places of the world that humans do not dare to tread. They also consume unique lifeforms that we’re not familiar with. I posit that the people of the Biblical age knew that eating animals of unknown origin was a bad idea. Lord knows what these animals were exposed to. Whatever they were exposed to, we in turn become exposed.

The irony is that while modern-day atheists and the anti-religious crowd say that the Bible is incompatible with science, the latter can easily back up a lot of what the Bible says. Case in point: the consumption of bats.

An accepted theory about the ongoing Corona pandemic is that Patient Zero was a Chinese national that ate an infected bat. Why on Earth would we dine on an animal that dwells in places we don’t travel to? They carry certain elements that our bodies are simply not accustomed to. Namely, diseases. (HIV came from primates, supposedly)

Hey, if we’re able to put 2 and 2 together in this day and age and apply common sense and reasoning, I assure you that the average “cavemen” could, too. While the people of antiquity did not have the benefit of scientific tools and methods, they were still able to see the bare essence of things. They were able to see basic, funademental truths with their own eyes.

The world has been straying from Biblical common sense for a while now. We’re straying from social mores that our ancestors correctly affirmed to be logical and sensible. It seems we’re paying the price for this recklessness. The Corona pandemic is only the latest in a long line of examples of how ignoring Biblical doctrine has actual consequences.

We’re on a collision course, folks. In the end, truth will win. And so will the Biblical way of ages past.

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