YouTube Copyright Claim…

Yesterday, I made a commentary video on “More than a Feeling, a song by a band called Boston. It happens to be the greatest song that ever existed. At least it is in the world of Corey E. Toomey.

Brad Delp’s voice was simply powerful in this one (“I closed my eyes and I slipped awaaaaaaaaayyyyyyyy~”). His voice was masculine, yet angelic. Delp somehow made it sound effortless. His harmonies really added to the song’s aura. Of course, we can’t forget John Scholz’s guitar melodies and Fran Sheehan’s rhythmic bass lines. The song is great in every way imaginable. To date, I have yet to hear something that infuses as much rock and soul as More than a Feeling does (and I’ve listened to a lot of Led Zeppelin in my time, so there).

But that’s not the point of this blog, not fully anyway. The video I released yesterday was banned the second I submitted it for upload. The reason being is that it contained copyrighted material. YouTube’s technology is too sophisticated nowadays and nothing gets past them anymore. The only problem with that is I only used the footage of the original music video, not the song itself. Play the video, and all you can hear is my own voice making commentary.

Films, videos, and anything of the visual medium falls under Fair Use. If it’s something audible, like a song, then the most stringent copyright laws kick in. It’s just the way it is. Musicians have always been stingy when it comes to their content (Metallica v. Napster, musicians telling politicians to stop playing their songs at rallies, etc.)

It’s just one thing us content creators need to be on the lookout for. Fortunately, there are other resources if you need a song for a video. My video editor, Videopad, has free stock sounds in their inventory. Websites like Bensound offer royalty-free songs, too. Although their “free” selection is limited, they offer more for a one-time price.

Anyway, back to More than a Feeling: I’ve submitted a dispute and expect a response in the next 30 days. At the time of this writing, it’s only banned in certain territories (they won’t say which). My main hope is to have the block lifted everywhere.

If it’s still demonitized, I really don’t care. Should I become a YouTube Partner (1,000+ subscribers and 4,000+ watch hours), I’ll have other videos to make money off of.

What’s important to me is to use this platform as a means of expressing myself and my opinions. I want this channel to be used so people can know who I am. I don’t believe self-expression should be limited to writing.

Content creation presents a lot of hurdles. Some of them are unfair, and you’ll have to fight for what you create. If you don’t have a passion for your own work, you’ll probably take these claims sitting down. Everything is a test, and only those who fight will surpass their current boundaries.

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